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GPS Routes & Course Maps for Asheville Off-Road Series

GPS Routes & Course Maps for Asheville Off-Road Series

Routes via Ride with GPS with clickable links/elevation and cue sheets

 

Duathlon

Asheville Duathlon Run #1 https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30559040

Asheville Duathlon Bike https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30978451

Asheville Duathlon Run #2 - Westover Trails https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30786766

 

Gravel Grinders

20 Mile – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30660041

40 Mile – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30667543

60 Mile – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30783313

 

Run

10k Off Road – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30529766

RACE MORNING

When arriving at Biltmore you will follow traffic to Antler Hill Village and be parked by Biltmore Estate Parking Hosts. Leave yourself PLENTY of time to get onto the estate and to the parking lots. It takes a minimum of 20 minutes when coming onto the estate to get to Antler Hill Village. When the first races begin at 7:45am, traffic will be held on the estate until at least 8:05am. SO PLEASE DON’T BE LATE!

Please note: If you are participating in the duathlon, your bike will need to go to the transition area and be set up prior to the race. So leave yourself plenty of time to unload your bike and race items at your car, walk your items to transition and get set-up prior to the race start. There is NO DROP OFF or UNLOAD AREA! Please orient yourself with transition when you arrive at the event and how you will go in/out the transition area on Run 1, Bike IN/Bike Out and Run 2. If you go out the transition area the wrong way during the race, your transition split time will be inaccurate and may not show up for you in the results. See Hub Map for details on transition and location of the zone in Antler Hill Village. 

Course Maps

2019 AORS Participant Guide 

Here’s your 2019 Asheville Off Road Series Participant Guide. This guide includes the race schedule for the Asheville Duathlon, Asheville Off-Road 10K and the Asheville Gravel Grinder Bike events all set for Sunday, September 15th.

We hope everyone has an amazing Asheville Off Road Series experience at Biltmore Estate! Please contact support@idaph.net if you have any questions about this event.

What’s it like to ride the Gravel Grinder?

We get a lot of questions about what the Gravel Grinder is like to ride. Here longtime cyclist and Asheville local Billy McCracken talks about the course, which is part asphalt, mostly gravel, and not too much elevation gain. This event takes place on the West side of Biltmore Estate. Video Credit: Wright Creative, Inc.

Past iDaph Blogs

Virtual Races 2020

Virtual Races 2020

What is a virtual run, bike or swim? Virtual races are all the rage these days. What is a virtual event? Picture a race that you can do all on your own, from any place at any time. You still get a commemorative medal and cool race t-shirt, and your results get posted...

Asheville Off-Road Series Participant Information

Asheville Off-Road Series Participant Information

Participant Guide Released for Asheville Off-Road Series

Here’s your 2019 Asheville Off Road Series Participant Guide. This guide includes the race schedule for the Asheville Duathlon, Asheville Off-Road 10K and the Asheville Gravel Grinder Bike events all set for Sunday, September 15th.

We hope everyone has an amazing Asheville Off Road Series experience at Biltmore Estate! Please contact support@idaph.net if you have any questions about this event.

Routes via Ride with GPS with clickable links/elevation and cue sheets

 

Duathlon

Asheville Duathlon Run #1 https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30559040

Asheville Duathlon Bike https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30978451

Asheville Duathlon Run #2 - Westover Trails https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30786766

 

Gravel Grinders

20 Mile – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30660041

40 Mile – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30667543

60 Mile – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30783313

 

Run

10k Off Road – https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30529766

What’s it like to ride the Gravel Grinder?

We get a lot of questions about what the Gravel Grinder is like to ride. Here longtime cyclist and Asheville local Billy McCracken talks about the course, which is part asphalt, mostly gravel, and not too much elevation gain. This event takes place on the West side of Biltmore Estate. Video Credit: Wright Creative, Inc.

Past iDaph Blogs

Virtual Races 2020

Virtual Races 2020

What is a virtual run, bike or swim? Virtual races are all the rage these days. What is a virtual event? Picture a race that you can do all on your own, from any place at any time. You still get a commemorative medal and cool race t-shirt, and your results get posted...

Results are In for the Asheville Triathlon!

Results are In for the Asheville Triathlon!

Thank you to all of our participants this year! We were glad to have everyone out here for this wonderful event.

Top Female Finisher: Sarah Alexander          57:54.5

Top Male Finisher: Oliver Porter                     59:53.3

2 Person Relay: Mina Madness                       1:29:01

3 Person Relay: Tri-Amigos                              1:14:05

Overall Results

Colombia Triathlete Jorge Marin to join Asheville Triathlon

Colombia Triathlete Jorge Marin to join Asheville Triathlon

Asheville Triathlon a great event to meet local triathletes, says Marin

We are super excited to meet Triathlon Coach Jorge Marin at our Asheville Triathlon this weekend! 

Jorge coaches a triathlon team called Tritanium in Colombia, and he organizes a triathlon race every year in his country. He definitely has some experience under his belt: 14 years as a triathlete, several completed triathlons in Colombia and few half Ironmans in the United States. He is preparing to do is first Full Ironman in Florida in November. 

Jorge placed 5th overall and 2nd place in his age group in  a recent national half Ironman, and he has another one planned in the Outer Banks here in North Carolina in September.

So why is he participating in our Asheville Triathlon? 

“Because I will be visiting Asheville for 10 days and saw there is a triathlon here, and I thought it could be a nice opportunity to meet people here,” Jorge said. “Also because Asheville is a beautiful city.”

Jorge said he would love to meet more local triathletes, so please give him a warm welcome when you see him this weekend.

We did ask Jorge if he would like to compete against Professional Triathlete Sarah Alexander, who is also competing  Sunday. He replied via email with smiley face icons:

“Hehe, I am not a professional triathlete like Sarah. I bet she will kick my a$$ for sure!”

I guess our money is still on Sarah. 🙂

Good luck Jorge we can’t wait to see you and all of our other participants in action this Sunday, July 21st at  Asheville Rec Park! 

For more details about the Asheville Triathlon, click here

Past iDaph Blogs

Virtual Races 2020

Virtual Races 2020

What is a virtual run, bike or swim? Virtual races are all the rage these days. What is a virtual event? Picture a race that you can do all on your own, from any place at any time. You still get a commemorative medal and cool race t-shirt, and your results get posted...

Pro Triathlete Sarah Alexander to join Asheville Triathlon

Pro Triathlete Sarah Alexander to join Asheville Triathlon

Professional Triathlete Sarah Alexander to join Asheville Tri

About Sarah: Sarah Alexander is an elite triathlete racing professionally since 2016. In 2019 she completed a 70.3 Ironman in Gult Coast and placed 5th. The same year she placed 6th in the 70.3 Ironman in Geelong. Her Peak ITU World Ranking is 62, and in 2018 she placed 4th in the Elite National Championships.

If you’re attending the Asheville Triathlon this month, you may see Sarah Alexander, pro triathlete and member of USA Triathlon. Sarah, 32, moved to Asheville in the spring and is training to do five half Ironmans this year. She will be participating in the Asheville Tri on Sunday, July 21st. 

Ok you might not see her. Because she’ll be kicking your a$$….

All joking aside, that’s exactly what makes the Asheville Triathlon such an all-encompassing event. The sprint distances allow for all levels of participants, from first-timers to pros, and many in-between. It’s the perfect race for someone who wants to “try the tri” for the first time, but it’s also a great event for an elite triathlete, like Sarah, because she can go fast and hard.

“My first triathlons were all local tris, and I think there’s something special about those races,” Sarah said. “I feel like it brings me back to my roots. Also the distance is great because it challenges you in terms of speed.”

Favorite Role Models

  • Daniela Ryf. She has dominated the sport. She Inspires me because she is relentless. 
  • Mirinda Carfrae. She has a young daughter but still commits to the sport. She sets a great example for moms continuing to pursue their dreams while raising their families.
  • My mom. She introduced me to tri. I was 15 and I remember her driving down to the track at 4 a.m. I’d sit in the car and cheer her on when she ran by. I have so much respect how she balanced training with her work and still priorited my brothers and my activities. I would have no idea what triathlon was if it wasn’t for her. 

An athlete in the making

Sarah’s background was full of athletics: She grew up playing lacrosse, tennis, and was a competitive figure skater for 15 years.  In fact, skating helped shape the type of athlete she is today. 

“I loved skating but I would cry every day because I wanted to quit,” Sarah recalls. “When you’re working on a jump, you try it and fall, try it and fall. You come off the ice soaking wet and sore…It really molded my work ethic. I’d say there’s a big mental component of performance for all sports, but especially for figure skating.”

When Sarah went to college, she had planned to join the cross country team but was recruited by the rowing team instead. She became a rower for Dartmouth College’s Varsity team for four years. She was 110 pounds when she started school, and left weighing 165. Talk about the freshman 15!

“I gained the rowing 40,” she said, laughing. “I was always trying to bulk up.”

Her strong legs, sense of rhythm, attention to technique and aerobic strength translated well into her first triathlon, which she completed in her early 20s. After graduating, she went on to business school, but decided to forego the corporate salary and become a professional triathlete. The window to train pro is small, she said. She wanted to seize the opportunity and see where it takes her. 

Joining up with the Asheville community

Sarah now trains with Triathlon Gold based in Asheville, a USA Triathlon program headed up by elite triathlon coach Jarrod Evans. 

“It’s been a journey,” she says. “I’m competing with women who have been doing tris a lot longer than I have, and it’s been a lot of dedication and hard work.”

Sarah heard about the Asheville Triathlon as she was researching local races to help prepare her for international half Ironmans. The timing was perfect, and she is looking forward to meeting members of the local sports community.

What is her favorite part of a triathlon?

“Running. But it’s a love/hate relationship,” she says, smiling. 

Next steps

Sarah’s next event is the Santa Rosa 70.3 in Sonoma County , California. Her current race goals include the 2020 Ironman 70.3 World Championships, and to win a Half Ironman. We wish her all the best and look forward to seeing her succeed in her journey. 

Come cheer on Sarah at the Asheville Triathlon Sunday, July 21st! You can still register here. Spaces are limited and we are filling up quickly!

Sarah’s Top Three Tips for Beginner Triathletes:

  • “Performance favors the prepared. Gear, nutrition, what you’ll need in transition.. All those things can become overwhelming.  Taking the time to seek out help, to prepare ahead of time. You only have your first tri race once, so having all those pieces in place as you can…it then allows you to not have stressful negative experience and really enjoy the race.
  • “Don’t be too hard on yourself. I think tris attract high performers and competitive people, and along with that comes a lot of self criticism and comparing yourself to others.I can definitely relate to that feeling of intimidation. Others have done more races, have more accomplishments..but Hey, I’m here for me, I’m going to do my best, I’m going to enjoy it. And that’s all you can really do at the end of the day. 
  • “Be courageous. This is a mantra of mine. In Triathlon, it feels like everything is happening very fast. It teaches you to be brave. Everyone has their own demons they have to overcome on race day, so tri not only teaches you to be brave, but I find that courage goes  a long way. I’ve beaten a lot of people who, on paper, I would not have if it weren’t for courage. Because I go for it, I’ve beaten them.”

Past iDaph Blogs

Virtual Races 2020

Virtual Races 2020

What is a virtual run, bike or swim? Virtual races are all the rage these days. What is a virtual event? Picture a race that you can do all on your own, from any place at any time. You still get a commemorative medal and cool race t-shirt, and your results get posted...

Training for the Asheville Triathlon: Swimming

Training for the Asheville Triathlon: Swimming

Meet Asheville’s Zach Tacy, an elite triathlete who recently completed the  Ironman Virginia 70.3 with a total time of 4:21:23. He PR’d by 10 minutes and was first in his age group, 8th overall, and qualified for the World Championships In Nice, France.

He also competed in the 70.3 World Championship in South Africa with a total time of 4:34:01 and placed 407th overall. He was 28th in his age group out of over 4,500 world athletes.

Swimming Techniques for Sprint Tri

When you think of a triathlete, you probably picture someone like Zach Tacy: Super fit and lean, ready to run, swim and bike circles around you before you’re even done strapping on your swim goggles.

But not every triathlete is an elite athlete, and not every triathlon is an Ironman. Sprint Triathlons - which offer shorter distances - are becoming increasingly popular. A Sprint Triathlon involves a .5 mile swim, a 12.4 mile bike and a 3.1 mile run, so training for it is extremely doable. It’s a great gateway into the sport of triathlon; in fact, Zach’s first tri was the Asheville Triathlon, which is a sprint tri.

“When I crossed the finish line (at the Asheville Tri), the volunteers and staff were extremely supportive and so encouraging to everyone,” Zach says. “It was a phenomenal experience.”

Training for a Sprint Tri is easy to do as long as you stay consistent. Long workouts are not necessary, but doing all three sports on a regular basis each week is what will set you up for success. We will have three blogs posted over the next couple of weeks on techniques for swimming, biking and running. Here are some tips to get you started on the right path.

Swim Training: Breathing

 When training for any triathlon, it is very important to work on your swimming technique. Zach’s first tip? Don’t forget to breathe. Seems like a no-brainer, but it’s more difficult than you may think.

“It’s something I’m still working on,” Zach admits. “Having proper technique for swimming is so important - it’s more important than in running or biking.

A lot of people hold their breath while swimming, he addds, which leads to quicker fatigue and gasping for air. Instead, focus on a steady inhale/exhale rhythm, much like in yoga and running. Blow air out from your nose while your face is submerged and empty your lungs, then on every other stroke, tilt your head to the side, halfway out of the water, and take in oxygen. Once comfortable with that, inhale every three strokes while expelling air in between to practice getting air on both sides.

“This allows for a smoother breathing pattern, decreased fatigue, and allows the swimmer to focus more on effort and swim stroke than breathing.”

Bonus tip: Developing a breathing pattern is also very helpful for running.

“It should feel comfortable and natural,” Zach says. “And, it may change! Let it grow and evolve with your running.”

Save your legs for biking and running

 When swimming, rely mostly on your arms to pull you through the water. There are plenty of practice drills you can work on to accomplish this. For example, you can start each of your swim sessions with 10-15 minutes of some of the following drills:

  • Fingertip Drag: Drag your fingertips along the surface of the water when you bring your arm forward after a stroke. This helps you control your arm movement and keeping your elbow bent.
  • Doggie Paddle: Remember this one when you were a kid? Keep your chin on the surface of the water and push your elbows outward as you swim forward, keeping your hands under the water.
  • Clenched Fists: Swim your normal freestyle stroke with clenched fists. This emphasizes the role of the forearm.
  • Kickboard:Use a kickboard to focus only on your kick while keeping your arms stationary on the board.

Body Positioning

 Your head position will lead the rest of the body, says Zach. Your face should be at about a 45 degree angle in the water, with your forehead cresting the surface. Looking too far forward will cause resistance and pain in neck and shoulders, as well as making your body rotation more difficult. Looking too far down will also cause resistance.

Good body rotation is a very important when you’re swimming.

“When your arm enters the water, you want to reach a little further before starting your pull/stroke,” Zach says. “This will help with body rotation as well.”

The stroke should make a slight S-path in order to catch more water, and you should finish your stroke around the upper thigh.

“Also, drive from the hips! Allow your body rotation to propel you forward instead of fully relying on you shoulders and stroke. By driving from the hips and rotating your body properly, you will become a more efficient swimmer.”

Know what to expect

 It’s important to know what type of race start your event will have so you can prepare for it mentally and physically during your training. There are a couple of start styles that are the most common: A wave start, and a time trial start.

The Asheville Tri is a time-trial start, and your start time will be assigned to you (you can anticipate about five seconds between each swimmer). During the registration process, you will be asked to submit your 100 yard swim time. This is not the fastest you can swim 100 yards, but the time you expect to average during the entire swim. Here is a good guide when deciding what swim time to register for the Asheville Triathlon:

  • 0:50 – 1:20 : Super Fast (In contention to win the race and you swim competitively)
  • 1:21 – 1:45 : Fast Enough (Still starting in the first 1/3 of the event)
  • 1:46 – 2:10 : Average Swimmer (Swim well enough and don’t need to stop at the end of each lane)
  • 2:11 – 2:44 : Novice (Still getting used to swimming in a triathlon)
  • 2:45 – 4:59 : Complete beginner (I want to start at the back)

Be consistent in your training

 Try to swim once or twice a week, and aim for 250 meters. You can break your sessions into intervals of 25 meters (usually one length of a pool) of nonstop swimming with 20 seconds of rest in between to catch your breath. Remember: You don’t want to be gasping for air. Instead, enjoy your time in the pool. This will help you stay consistent and avoid skipping workouts.

“I am a Pisces,” says Zach. “I love being in the water! It doesn’t matter if it’s racing, training, or just for fun. Swimming can be a Zen state for me…Once I warm up and sync in my breathing, strokes, and rotation, the rest flows smooth.”

Click here for more information about the Asheville Triathlon, and to register for this event, which takes place Sunday, July 21st.

Editor’s note: We will continue to blog about the Asheville Triathlon in the upcoming weeks. Next up: Biking!

PHOTO CREDIT: WRIGHT CREATIVE, INC.

Sources: https://www.active.com/triathlon/articles/how-to-train-for-a-sprint-triathlon-6802

http://www.220triathlon.com/training/swim/10-essential-pool-swim-drills-for-triathletes/11545.html

Training Schedule for Asheville Triathlon

Two swims per week

Two bikes per week

Two runs per week

Zach Tacy talks about why the Asheville Triathlon is the event to sign up for this year.

Past iDaph Blogs

Virtual Races 2020

Virtual Races 2020

What is a virtual run, bike or swim? Virtual races are all the rage these days. What is a virtual event? Picture a race that you can do all on your own, from any place at any time. You still get a commemorative medal and cool race t-shirt, and your results get posted...