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Setting goals: How the Asheville Triathlon is providing stress relief for Certified Athletic Trainer Crystal Shirk

Setting goals: How the Asheville Triathlon is providing stress relief for Certified Athletic Trainer Crystal Shirk

“It helps me have a reason to get outside and breathe fresh air, and not be cooped up all the time. With reduced hours, moving around and being active is what I needed. It really did help me a lot.” ~ Crystal Shirk

For health care workers on the front line, sport training helps to reduce stress

Now that pools are reopening, Crystal Shirk is back in the water at 6am to get in her lap time. She is training for her first triathlon this summer, the Asheville Triathlon, a sprint tri being put on in Hendersonville July 19th. 

“I love trying something new,” says Crystal. “I love the challenge and the excitement of knowing you have an event coming up.”

The triathlon is good timing for Crystal. When COVID-19 hit, her job as a certified athletic trainer at a local high school changed dramatically. Her hours were reduced, and she and her fellow peers were asked to screen patients at Urgent Care for coronavirus symptoms, putting them directly on the front line of the pandemic. 

To help alleviate stress and stay motivated, Crystal, revved up her running and cycling.

“It helps me have a reason to get outside and breathe fresh air, and not be cooped up all the time,” Crystal says. “With reduced hours, moving around and being active is what I needed. It really did help me a lot.”

Setting a goal

Crystal is very goal-oriented, so when sport events were cancelled in March, it became more difficult to stay motivated and stick to a training plan. The Asheville Triathlon offers her an event to look forward to and work towards.

“I need to have a purpose,” she says. 

During COVID-19, Crystal also focused more on strength training and yoga. She found herself getting stronger, and now she feels more confident that she can complete a triathlon.

“I don’t want to go out and win it, I just want to do the best for me. I want to prove to myself that I can do it,” she says.

Returning to sport events 

Crystal says she understands numbers may be limited now at sport events, and protocols need to be put in place to keep everyone safe and adhere to current guidelines. As an athletic trainer, she is constantly working on bringing back events at the high school level. 

“That’s our daily talk right now,” she adds. 

When asked if she was nervous about returning to sport events, Crystal said she feels comfortable with it and is not afraid to do events again.

“Working in the healthcare industry…this doesn’t bother me,” she says. “I feel like in running events, being outdoors, I don’t worry about (COVID-19) as much.

“There’s going to be comfort levels. There’s going to be fears. Things have to return at some point. A select number of events here and there I think is a good idea.”

A sprint tri offers ‘doable’ distances for every level of athlete

The Asheville Triathlon course includes a 400 meter swim, a 12.5 mile bike course and a 5K run course. These distances make this sprint triathlon a good fit for every level of triathlete, and it’s a huge hit among locals who want to go out and try their best at a new sport.

“I think I’ll have fun doing it, and enjoy it,” Crystal adds.

Crystal is most afraid of swimming, she admits. But she knows she can swim at least 400 meters, which is the distance of the swim in the Asheville Triathlon. It’s mostly the transition she needs to practice at this point.

And no, she does not have a tri suit.

“I’ll probably wear a bathing suit with shorts,” she adds, laughing. “I don’t have an official suit.”

The Asheville Triathlon takes place on Sunday, July 19th, and changes have been put in place to address COVID-19. The location has been changed to Patton Park in Hendersonville, NC to ensure athletes are able to spread out and stay safely far enough apart from one another. The participant number has been limited, packet-pickup will be a drive-through option, and extra sanitizing precautions will be implemented. There is also a fun virtual option available where participants can swim, bike and run on their own time and still receive a shirt and medal. 

READ MORE ABOUT WHAT WE ARE DOING AT THE ASHEVILLE TRIATHLON TO ENSURE A SAFE EVENT

Crystal lives in Black Mountain, NC with her two children and her husband, Conrad, who is also doing the Asheville Triathlon. Crystal is also an Asheville Marathon and Half AmbassadorWe look forward to cheering on Crystal and  Conrad in July! 

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Building Speed and the Goldilocks of Rotation

Building Speed and the Goldilocks of Rotation

Building Speed and the ‘Goldilocks’ Amount of Rotation (not too little..not too much)

Swim Workout Thursday, January 9, 2020 

Build

Begin swim slow and relaxed focusing on good form while gradually increasing effort and speed. Because you finish the distance at a sprint, these will be difficult. So if the set is 2 x 100 Build, start slow on first 25 establishing a good stroke, then make each subsequent 25 faster. The last 15 yards to 25 should be an all out sprint. You restart your “build” with each swim of the set. So in the example of 2 x 100 Build, begin the 2nd 100 slow and relaxed again gradually building to spring at end.

Rotation focus

Use how far you turn your head as a guide to the amount of rotation. When you turn your head to breath attempt to get the top eye completely out of the water while keeping the bottom goggle or eye underwater. Your whole body rotates together. Imagine a skewer the length of your spine so that hips and shoulders turn together the same amount.

200 Choice Warm Up

4 x 25 Build (20 seconds rest between 25s)

Freestyle - Build Freestyle:

Group 1: 4 x 50 on 2:00 - Build

Group 2: 8 x 50 on 1:15 - Build

Group 3: 5 x 100 on 1:45 - Build

4 x 25 (20 seconds rest between 25s) - notice if goggles are above/underwater

Keep bottom goggle under and the top goggle above water when breathe. Keep hips and shoulders in line with each other:

Group 1: 4 x 50 on 2:00 - Freestyle - notice goggles

Group 2: 8 x 50 on 1:15 - Freestyle - notice goggles

Group 3: 6 x 100 on 1:40 - Freestyle - notice goggles

Endurance Freestyle – Long and strong stroke. Feel the power but keep a relatively slow stroke turnover. (relatively means compared to sprint stroke turnover at end of build swims)

Group 1: 2 x 100 - 30 seconds rest between 100s

Group 2: 1 x 300 - 1 minute rest then… 2 x 200 - 30 seconds rest between 200s

Group 3: 1 x 500 - 1 minute rest then… 1 x 400

Cool Down - Choice 5 minute swim

Distance before 5 minute cool down:

Group 1 1,000 yards

Group 2 1,900 yards

Group 3 2,400 yards 

 

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Winter Triathlon Training Tips

Winter Triathlon Training Tips

by Sarah Alexander

Photo credit: Wright Creative, Inc. 

As a professional triathlete, I have been able to “chase summer” in order to continue training outside year-round. Luckily, it’s possible to integrate indoor and outdoor training in Asheville throughout the winter!

Regardless, the focus of training certainly shifts a bit in the “off-season” as compared to racing season. Here are three pro tips to take your winter multisport training to the next level:

1. Get Strong! The winter training season is a great time to focus on foundational strength, which tends to take lower priority during the racing season. When the weather outside is frightful, the gym can be so delightful! There are a lot of posts about the benefits of strength training for endurance sport — both from an injury prevention and performance enhancement standpoint — that you can link to. Here are a couple “triathlon strength routine” posts:

Team USA

Mark Allen’s 12 Best Strength Exercises

2. Work your Weakness — Did you grow up swimming but have always struggled through the run? Or, like many, perhaps the two land disciplines are where you shine …. as long as you can actually make it out of the water! One of the big challenges with triathlon, especially during the racing season, is training all three disciplines (swim, bike and run). Winter is a great time to put in a dedicated block of training to develop a weakness and take your performance to the next level next season.

3. Keep it Diverse — The off-season is a great time to mix it up. While it’s great to set goals for next season and seize the off-season to start working towards those, don’t make the mistake of digging yourself into a physical or mental hole before racing even begins! Cross-country skiing, mountain biking, hiking, and even cardio exercise programs at your local gym are great ways to get a workout in without overdoing the classic swim, bike, run.

About Sarah
Sarah Alexander is a professional triathlete who participated in the 2019 Asheville Triathlon and was the overall winner! Since the Asheville Triathlon, Sarah won the Lake Logan International Triathlon on the women’s side (6th overall including men) and has continued to progress on the international stage, with a 7th place finish at IM 70.3 Santa Rosa and, most recently, 5th place at IM 70.3 Traverse City. She has been working hard in the hills and lakes of Asheville and hopes to continue her consistent progression in her final races of the season: IM 70.3 Cozumel (9/29), IM 70.3 Coquimbo (10/19), and IM 70.3 Los Cabos (11/3).

You can follow Sarah’s races on the IRONMAN results tracker, and she will continue to share her journey via social media (Instagram, Facebook).

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Pro Triathlete Sarah Alexander to join Asheville Triathlon

Pro Triathlete Sarah Alexander to join Asheville Triathlon

Professional Triathlete Sarah Alexander to join Asheville Tri

About Sarah: Sarah Alexander is an elite triathlete racing professionally since 2016. In 2019 she completed a 70.3 Ironman in Gult Coast and placed 5th. The same year she placed 6th in the 70.3 Ironman in Geelong. Her Peak ITU World Ranking is 62, and in 2018 she placed 4th in the Elite National Championships.

If you’re attending the Asheville Triathlon this month, you may see Sarah Alexander, pro triathlete and member of USA Triathlon. Sarah, 32, moved to Asheville in the spring and is training to do five half Ironmans this year. She will be participating in the Asheville Tri on Sunday, July 21st. 

Ok you might not see her. Because she’ll be kicking your a$$….

All joking aside, that’s exactly what makes the Asheville Triathlon such an all-encompassing event. The sprint distances allow for all levels of participants, from first-timers to pros, and many in-between. It’s the perfect race for someone who wants to “try the tri” for the first time, but it’s also a great event for an elite triathlete, like Sarah, because she can go fast and hard.

“My first triathlons were all local tris, and I think there’s something special about those races,” Sarah said. “I feel like it brings me back to my roots. Also the distance is great because it challenges you in terms of speed.”

Favorite Role Models

  • Daniela Ryf. She has dominated the sport. She Inspires me because she is relentless. 
  • Mirinda Carfrae. She has a young daughter but still commits to the sport. She sets a great example for moms continuing to pursue their dreams while raising their families.
  • My mom. She introduced me to tri. I was 15 and I remember her driving down to the track at 4 a.m. I’d sit in the car and cheer her on when she ran by. I have so much respect how she balanced training with her work and still priorited my brothers and my activities. I would have no idea what triathlon was if it wasn’t for her. 

An athlete in the making

Sarah’s background was full of athletics: She grew up playing lacrosse, tennis, and was a competitive figure skater for 15 years.  In fact, skating helped shape the type of athlete she is today. 

“I loved skating but I would cry every day because I wanted to quit,” Sarah recalls. “When you’re working on a jump, you try it and fall, try it and fall. You come off the ice soaking wet and sore…It really molded my work ethic. I’d say there’s a big mental component of performance for all sports, but especially for figure skating.”

When Sarah went to college, she had planned to join the cross country team but was recruited by the rowing team instead. She became a rower for Dartmouth College’s Varsity team for four years. She was 110 pounds when she started school, and left weighing 165. Talk about the freshman 15!

“I gained the rowing 40,” she said, laughing. “I was always trying to bulk up.”

Her strong legs, sense of rhythm, attention to technique and aerobic strength translated well into her first triathlon, which she completed in her early 20s. After graduating, she went on to business school, but decided to forego the corporate salary and become a professional triathlete. The window to train pro is small, she said. She wanted to seize the opportunity and see where it takes her. 

Joining up with the Asheville community

Sarah now trains with Triathlon Gold based in Asheville, a USA Triathlon program headed up by elite triathlon coach Jarrod Evans. 

“It’s been a journey,” she says. “I’m competing with women who have been doing tris a lot longer than I have, and it’s been a lot of dedication and hard work.”

Sarah heard about the Asheville Triathlon as she was researching local races to help prepare her for international half Ironmans. The timing was perfect, and she is looking forward to meeting members of the local sports community.

What is her favorite part of a triathlon?

“Running. But it’s a love/hate relationship,” she says, smiling. 

Next steps

Sarah’s next event is the Santa Rosa 70.3 in Sonoma County , California. Her current race goals include the 2020 Ironman 70.3 World Championships, and to win a Half Ironman. We wish her all the best and look forward to seeing her succeed in her journey. 

Come cheer on Sarah at the Asheville Triathlon Sunday, July 21st! You can still register here. Spaces are limited and we are filling up quickly!

Sarah’s Top Three Tips for Beginner Triathletes:

  • “Performance favors the prepared. Gear, nutrition, what you’ll need in transition.. All those things can become overwhelming.  Taking the time to seek out help, to prepare ahead of time. You only have your first tri race once, so having all those pieces in place as you can…it then allows you to not have stressful negative experience and really enjoy the race.
  • “Don’t be too hard on yourself. I think tris attract high performers and competitive people, and along with that comes a lot of self criticism and comparing yourself to others.I can definitely relate to that feeling of intimidation. Others have done more races, have more accomplishments..but Hey, I’m here for me, I’m going to do my best, I’m going to enjoy it. And that’s all you can really do at the end of the day. 
  • “Be courageous. This is a mantra of mine. In Triathlon, it feels like everything is happening very fast. It teaches you to be brave. Everyone has their own demons they have to overcome on race day, so tri not only teaches you to be brave, but I find that courage goes  a long way. I’ve beaten a lot of people who, on paper, I would not have if it weren’t for courage. Because I go for it, I’ve beaten them.”

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Training for the Asheville Triathlon: Running

Training for the Asheville Triathlon: Running

Meet Asheville’s Zach Tacy, an elite triathlete who recently completed the  Ironman Virginia 70.3 with a total time of 4:21:23. He PR’d by 10 minutes and was first in his age group, 8th overall, and qualified for the World Championships In Nice, France.

He also competed in the 70.3 World Championship in South Africa with a total time of 4:34:01 and placed 407th overall. He was 28th in his age group out of over 4,500 world athletes.

His most recent accomplishment was the Ironman 70.3 Eagleman, where he placed first out of 44 in his age group and 34th overall out of 2,174 participants. As a former iDream Athlete, our iDaph team couldn’t be prouder of Zach’s accomplishments. 

Running Tips for Sprint Tri

So many of us have a love/hate relationship with running. There are days when you can happily run for miles, and other days where you’d like to give up running altogether.

Even Zach Tacy,  an elite triathlete (who has run a mile or two), says the more you exercise, the more hard days you will have.

“Everyone has hard days. Sometimes just showing up is the best you can do and that’s okay, because you showed up, because you found the mental power to be there, even when you’re not feeling it, even when you know it’s going to hurt.”

Intervals are key

With running, it’s important to change up your work-outs, Zach says. Try a couple of easy runs, then push yourself by doing intervals at a tempo-run. What is tempo? A pace about 25 to 30 seconds per mile slower than your current 5K race pace. Zach suggests running a mile at this pace, then running a 200 to 400 at a slower pace, depending on your skill level. For a sprint tri, he suggests running 800s and 1,000s at a slower pace.

Active.com suggests the following sprint-specific workouts for the run and bike portion of a sprint triathlon:

Tempo Brick: 45- to 6-minute bike: Warm Up and then include 4 x 5K intervals at race-pace effort (2-minute recoversies).

15- to 20-minute run: Following the bike effort, quickly transition to the run at your 5K race pace. Walk/easy jog for a few minutes for your cooldown.

Shaving down transition time

Practicing the transition from bike to run is important, Zach points out - especially for beginners.

“When you get off your bike, your legs feel funny. It’s a really weird feeling that you have to get used to,” he adds. “That’s something I didn’t expect at all the first time I did a tri, so it’s definitely good to get experience with that.”

Track Brick workouts are great for this. Active.com suggests the following workout:

Complete a 4- to 5-mile ride with the last mile at race-pace effort. Then quickly transition to a 1-mile run on the track. Build speed each quarter, so that the last quarter is at 5K race-pace effort. Complete this pattern two more times for a total of 12 to 15 miles of cycling and 3 miles of running. Following the last mile run, do a walk/easy jog for a few minutes for your cooldown.

Practice good form

With running, form is especially important.

“Most runners don’t use their arms enough,” Zach points out. “You don’t want to be actively pumping your arms, but don’t keep them slack. Have motion in them - this opens up your stride and is very beneficial. You’ll get more power doing less work.”

There’s a lot of technical form where minor adjustments can make a big difference. Another important tip with running is to keep your body relaxed.

“If you start tensing up and trying to push harder, generally your form will fall apart,” Zach says. “When I notice myself doing this, I take a quick mental refresher, shake it out, open my stride and try to relax my shoulders.”

Lean forward, Zach adds.

“Lean into the rush, THEN start pushing. Use the right muscle groups to finish strong.”

Don’t skimp on running shoes

Visiting a local running store and getting properly fitted can save you miles of pain and suffering. For training purposes, Zach recommends getting a shoe that’s comfortable and has decent cushion. Runners often opt for a lighter shoe to make them feel faster, but more minimalist shoes can also put more stress on your joints.

“A lot of people want the lightest shoe, but for training purposes - especially when road running –  get something that has more support.”

Join a local running group

Asheville has plenty of local running groups to choose from to keep you motivated. Jus’ Running, for example, has weekly track and running workouts. Fleet Feet also has weekly running groups for all abilities, along with Vertical Runner in Black Mountain.

Give kudos to others

Another tip that Zach feels helps him stay motivated is to give others encouragement during races.

“It reminds me that I have enough energy to keep pushing myself. I try to encourage other racers while I’m racing because everyone is out there trying their best,” he says. “Not everyone has a support crew to cheer them on…they’re just doing their race.”

Our iDaph Team will definitely be cheering you on during the Asheville Triathlon next month. Click here for more information about the Asheville Triathlon, and to register for this event, which takes place Sunday, July 21st.

Sources: https://www.active.com/triathlon/articles/8-tough-workouts-for-your-fastest-sprint-triathlon-yet

Think you're too cool to Tri?

Well. You might be. But here’s some tips for running whether this is your first triathlon or 1,000th. Remember - a sprint tri is a 5K run. You totally got this!

 

  • Tip 1: Stay “Relaxed”. Try to prevent tensing up the shoulders.
  • Tip 2: Dig deep. Running is as much mental strength as it is physical, so when a race or workout gets hard, you’ve got to dig deep to find the strength to finish strong.
  • Tip 3: Finish Strong! You will never regret the pain it takes.

(Photo Credit: Wright Creative, Inc.)

Training Schedule for Asheville Triathlon

Two swims per week

Two bikes per week

Two runs per week

Zach Tacy talks about why the Asheville Triathlon is the event to sign up for this year.

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Training for the Asheville Triathlon: Swimming

Training for the Asheville Triathlon: Swimming

Meet Asheville’s Zach Tacy, an elite triathlete who recently completed the  Ironman Virginia 70.3 with a total time of 4:21:23. He PR’d by 10 minutes and was first in his age group, 8th overall, and qualified for the World Championships In Nice, France.

He also competed in the 70.3 World Championship in South Africa with a total time of 4:34:01 and placed 407th overall. He was 28th in his age group out of over 4,500 world athletes.

Swimming Techniques for Sprint Tri

When you think of a triathlete, you probably picture someone like Zach Tacy: Super fit and lean, ready to run, swim and bike circles around you before you’re even done strapping on your swim goggles.

But not every triathlete is an elite athlete, and not every triathlon is an Ironman. Sprint Triathlons - which offer shorter distances - are becoming increasingly popular. A Sprint Triathlon involves a .5 mile swim, a 12.4 mile bike and a 3.1 mile run, so training for it is extremely doable. It’s a great gateway into the sport of triathlon; in fact, Zach’s first tri was the Asheville Triathlon, which is a sprint tri.

“When I crossed the finish line (at the Asheville Tri), the volunteers and staff were extremely supportive and so encouraging to everyone,” Zach says. “It was a phenomenal experience.”

Training for a Sprint Tri is easy to do as long as you stay consistent. Long workouts are not necessary, but doing all three sports on a regular basis each week is what will set you up for success. We will have three blogs posted over the next couple of weeks on techniques for swimming, biking and running. Here are some tips to get you started on the right path.

Swim Training: Breathing

 When training for any triathlon, it is very important to work on your swimming technique. Zach’s first tip? Don’t forget to breathe. Seems like a no-brainer, but it’s more difficult than you may think.

“It’s something I’m still working on,” Zach admits. “Having proper technique for swimming is so important - it’s more important than in running or biking.

A lot of people hold their breath while swimming, he addds, which leads to quicker fatigue and gasping for air. Instead, focus on a steady inhale/exhale rhythm, much like in yoga and running. Blow air out from your nose while your face is submerged and empty your lungs, then on every other stroke, tilt your head to the side, halfway out of the water, and take in oxygen. Once comfortable with that, inhale every three strokes while expelling air in between to practice getting air on both sides.

“This allows for a smoother breathing pattern, decreased fatigue, and allows the swimmer to focus more on effort and swim stroke than breathing.”

Bonus tip: Developing a breathing pattern is also very helpful for running.

“It should feel comfortable and natural,” Zach says. “And, it may change! Let it grow and evolve with your running.”

Save your legs for biking and running

 When swimming, rely mostly on your arms to pull you through the water. There are plenty of practice drills you can work on to accomplish this. For example, you can start each of your swim sessions with 10-15 minutes of some of the following drills:

  • Fingertip Drag: Drag your fingertips along the surface of the water when you bring your arm forward after a stroke. This helps you control your arm movement and keeping your elbow bent.
  • Doggie Paddle: Remember this one when you were a kid? Keep your chin on the surface of the water and push your elbows outward as you swim forward, keeping your hands under the water.
  • Clenched Fists: Swim your normal freestyle stroke with clenched fists. This emphasizes the role of the forearm.
  • Kickboard:Use a kickboard to focus only on your kick while keeping your arms stationary on the board.

Body Positioning

 Your head position will lead the rest of the body, says Zach. Your face should be at about a 45 degree angle in the water, with your forehead cresting the surface. Looking too far forward will cause resistance and pain in neck and shoulders, as well as making your body rotation more difficult. Looking too far down will also cause resistance.

Good body rotation is a very important when you’re swimming.

“When your arm enters the water, you want to reach a little further before starting your pull/stroke,” Zach says. “This will help with body rotation as well.”

The stroke should make a slight S-path in order to catch more water, and you should finish your stroke around the upper thigh.

“Also, drive from the hips! Allow your body rotation to propel you forward instead of fully relying on you shoulders and stroke. By driving from the hips and rotating your body properly, you will become a more efficient swimmer.”

Know what to expect

 It’s important to know what type of race start your event will have so you can prepare for it mentally and physically during your training. There are a couple of start styles that are the most common: A wave start, and a time trial start.

The Asheville Tri is a time-trial start, and your start time will be assigned to you (you can anticipate about five seconds between each swimmer). During the registration process, you will be asked to submit your 100 yard swim time. This is not the fastest you can swim 100 yards, but the time you expect to average during the entire swim. Here is a good guide when deciding what swim time to register for the Asheville Triathlon:

  • 0:50 – 1:20 : Super Fast (In contention to win the race and you swim competitively)
  • 1:21 – 1:45 : Fast Enough (Still starting in the first 1/3 of the event)
  • 1:46 – 2:10 : Average Swimmer (Swim well enough and don’t need to stop at the end of each lane)
  • 2:11 – 2:44 : Novice (Still getting used to swimming in a triathlon)
  • 2:45 – 4:59 : Complete beginner (I want to start at the back)

Be consistent in your training

 Try to swim once or twice a week, and aim for 250 meters. You can break your sessions into intervals of 25 meters (usually one length of a pool) of nonstop swimming with 20 seconds of rest in between to catch your breath. Remember: You don’t want to be gasping for air. Instead, enjoy your time in the pool. This will help you stay consistent and avoid skipping workouts.

“I am a Pisces,” says Zach. “I love being in the water! It doesn’t matter if it’s racing, training, or just for fun. Swimming can be a Zen state for me…Once I warm up and sync in my breathing, strokes, and rotation, the rest flows smooth.”

Click here for more information about the Asheville Triathlon, and to register for this event, which takes place Sunday, July 21st.

Editor’s note: We will continue to blog about the Asheville Triathlon in the upcoming weeks. Next up: Biking!

PHOTO CREDIT: WRIGHT CREATIVE, INC.

Sources: https://www.active.com/triathlon/articles/how-to-train-for-a-sprint-triathlon-6802

http://www.220triathlon.com/training/swim/10-essential-pool-swim-drills-for-triathletes/11545.html

Training Schedule for Asheville Triathlon

Two swims per week

Two bikes per week

Two runs per week

Zach Tacy talks about why the Asheville Triathlon is the event to sign up for this year.

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We can't wait to see you at the Ugly Sweater Run Here's what you need to know for Packet Pick-up and Race Day. Thank you for signing up for the Ugly Sweater Run! May your feet be light and your sweaters be hideously delightful. Please take a moment to read through our...

South Asheville Turkey Trot Pre-Event Guide

South Asheville Turkey Trot Pre-Event Guide

We can't wait to see you at the South Asheville Turkey Trot 5K! Here's what you need to know for Packet Pick-up and Race Day. We are thankful you're here! Thank you for signing up for the South Asheville Turkey Trot. We can't wait to celebrate our Thanksgiving morning...